Olive & Sinclair isn’t just Nashville’s first bean-to-bar chocolate shop, it’s the first such store in all of Tennessee. This small-batch shop does everything in-house, from stone-grinding their cocoa to finishing up the ethically sourced, organic confections. The results are scrumptious, of course, and include signature Tennessee items like bourbon brittle and caramels alongside duck fat caramels that simply melt in your mouth.
Famous in New York and internationally as an uncompromising chocolatier, Jaques Torres makes gourmet chocolate chip cookies that are an elegant and rich version of everyone’s favorite cookie. Each cookie measures 5 inches in diameter. Jacques uses his rich, house blend 60% dark chocolate baking discs, which means this cookie skews to the adult tastes, or kids with a discerning palate.
We were struck by the fine presentation of this collection by Ferrero. Every piece of high-quality chocolate comes individually wrapped making them a perfect addition to any party or just a nice treat to go with after dinner wine. The box itself is designed perfectly for gift-giving and the variety of chocolates inside mean that there are tastes and textures to satisfy almost any chocolate enthusiast out there. Each piece of chocolate flawlessly combines a smooth taste with a crisp and crunchy wafer center, with a dash of hazelnuts rounding out the flavors.
Our chocolate drinks are made using premium single origin chocolate. We make 3 drinking chocolates (a classic dark French style, a lighter Venezuelan milk with cinnamon, and a spicy dark one with ginger, coconut milk and other spices) and several different hot chocolates including vegan and sugar free options. To compliment the chocolate we have espresso from Caffe Vita, Salt & Straw Alberquina Olive Oil ice cream pour-overs, Bakeshop shortbread cookies, and other special treats. We also make Cacao Premium Drinking Chocolate and Cacao 100% Pure Dark Hot Chocolate mixes available for you to take home and enjoy later.
The Recchiuti Confections Black Box (16 pieces) was my personal favorite in our 2014 review, and after tasting them again for this year’s update, I immediately remembered why. The assortment contains the best mixture of classic and more exotic flavors, and the bonbons aren’t too sweet. This box also has the most unique selection visually, with chocolates of varying sizes and shapes, and the sleek packaging is more eye-catching than any other box we tried.
"Commence your tasting with the white chocolate, macadamia nut and Cointreau Ambrosia truffle; with your second sip give our milk chocolate Wink of the Rabbit truffle a whirl. Rosé Champagnes are a tad fuller bodied than their golden counterparts and in general, tend to stand up better to darker chocolates. Cheers to an eternal life of wine + chocolate!"
The Pistachio Marzipan and Bandol Breeze (apricot pâte de fruit and marzipan) were too weak for my taste, but most of Jacques Torres’ pieces had both good non-chocolate and chocolate flavors. The Golden Espresso was another very good piece. Mom’s Chocolate Peanut Brittle did not quite work for me, but Grandma’s Chocolate Peanut Butter Crunch was excellent, with a great roasted peanuts flavor and complementing chocolate. In spite of my few quibbles I, most of Torres’ pieces are done to near perfection, and I would class Torres with Burdick. Both are near the same quality. Burdick uses a bit more exotic flavors while Torres takes familiar flavors to great heights.
The zChocolat collection of chocolates combine with Valencia almonds, Piedmont hazelnuts, quality French butter and cream in the ganaches are world renowned. These are not your typical box of chocolates as you can expect caramels, pralines, Chocamandine, Orangettes, Pistachio-almond marzipan sprinkled with pieces of caramelized pistachios, passion fruit caramel, Venezuelan dark chocolate ganache, Hazelnut praline infused with coffee ganache, gifts catered to Valentine's Day with heart shaped chocolate and more. zChocolat is also unique in that it's made in the purest form, low in sugar, with no preservatives, no coloring, all natural ingredients, no alcohol and 100% pure cocoa butter.
The Tessieris did not set out to make chocolate. In the beginning, like the rest of the Chocolate Valley, they made candy. Their parents owned a business in Pontedera that sold pastry ingredients to bakers. Alessio and Cecilia went off on their own, but they didn’t stray far. They rented a small room in town and began to experiment with what they call pralines and we call filled chocolates. Soon enough, they wanted to move to a higher grade—the highest grade they knew. So the brother and sister, who were still in their 20s, went to visit a chocolate maker they greatly admired.

Ferrero Rocher is perhaps one of the most famous and popular choclate makers in the world with the confectionary produced by the Italian chocolatier Ferrero SpA. The chocolates were first introduced in Europe back in 1982 by Michael Ferrero and is world famous for its truffle bars of milk chocolate and generous hazelnut helpings. The balls consist of whole roasted hazelnuts within a thin wafer shell covered in the best quality milk chocolates and topped off with chopped hazelnuts.
Since 1997, this confectionery inside the Ferry Building on the Embarcadero has been putting artistic touches on their small batch yet exquisite chocolates, caramels, bars, sauces, fruit/nut mixes, and truffles. Their top-selling Fleur de Sel Caramels are covered in dark chocolate with a well-blended balance of salt and sweetness. For Valentine’s Day, their Hearts in Motion box provides a whole lot of lovin’—burnt caramel truffles embellished with Picasso-esque images. Grand Amour Box holds three layers of popular truffles like Ginger Heart, Piedmont Hazelnut and Force Noir.

Varsano’s looks like your average chocolate shop, so I was not expecting much, but their chocolates surprised me. Their uncommon white chocolate peanut butter cup was very nice, and the milk chocolate was good too. Marzipan is a favorite of mine, but only when it is elevated from a plain hard paste to something fluffier and more flavorful, and Varsano’s does that with an excellent chocolate-covered pistachio marzipan. I also liked the chocolate-covered graham cracker. The chocolate they use for covering their pieces is appealing. However, the buttercrunch tasted very weak to me, and the truffles did not impress me in 2006 as they did during my first visit.


Chocolate Apéritifs au Fromage is chocolate-covered cheese. That was an unusual combination, new to me. The flavors are balanced and modest, but the cheese prevails. The Boîte Gourmande contains plain square wafers of chocolate, Florentins (chocolate cookies, square wafers covered with a honey and nut confection), mendiants (chocolate disks topped with nuts and dried fruit), and chocolate sticks containing candied orange peel. All are good. These are little chocolate delicacies, to be savored. The dried fruit arrived still fresh and full of flavor.
Theo Chocolate can be found at many higher-end markets but a visit to its shop guarantees a taste of hard-to-find flavors, like a bonbon filled with caramel that’s flavored by the smoky heat of a ghost chile. Theo, which ships its chocolates nationwide, uses only organic and certified fair-trade chocolate for all of its creations. 3400 Phinney Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98103

Even if you haven’t been to Switzerland, you’ve probably had Swiss chocolate. Lindt is the most popular Swiss chocolate brand, and can be purchased around the world. What’s especially interesting about the production of Swiss chocolate is that although Switzerland’s climate isn’t conducive to growing cacao plants, they found a way to produce chocolate all the same. It’s also the Swiss who can claim the most chocolate consumption per capita – the average Swiss eats more than 10 kilos of chocolate per year!

Nobody knows for sure how many chocolate shops there are in the U.S. today, at least in part because many of them do double duty as patisseries, ice cream parlors, or gift shops. Suffice to say that there is probably not a city or a town of any size in the country that doesn’t boast at least one purveyor of specialty chocolates, and many places have more. There are at least 80 of them in New York City, for instance, and more than 30 in Los Angeles.
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