Traditionally, giving Chocolate as a gift can be a time consuming process. Driving to the local grocery or chocolate store, searching the limited selection, bringing it home, wrapping up the item, and then getting back in your car again to drive to the local Fed Ex or UPS Store to make the delivery actually happen - it can all be a time-consuming and frustrating challenge for anyone.
This box contains two pieces of a sixteen-chocolate selection, making for a wide range of flavors and textures. Presentation is an important factor when it comes to good gourmet chocolate, and there are no corners cut in that regard with this ultimate collection. Both boxes are packaged in a way that makes them ready for gift-giving or any party occasion and really speaks to the high production standards of this chocolatier. Flavors range from more traditional milk chocolates to toffees and pralines. Most consumers very much enjoy the high-quality taste of these chocolates. Even at their worst, they were described as “pleasantly average.”
Some pieces I liked were the dark chocolate Palets d’Or, Le Cocktail (with a blend of nuts, was what fine chocolate should be but not the oustanding piece I expected from Bernachon’s reputation), Le Métis (praline, marzipan, and pistachio, was an unusual melange and interesting), L’Aveline (hazelnut praline, was very good with sharp flavors that were not overpoweringly strong), La Truffe (a very good truffle), Le Chuao Pepitos (strong chocolate), La Nougatine (good caramel), and La Truffette (an orange flavor that blends well with the chocolate).
How much do you think the most expensive chocolate in the world is worth? Would you buy it if it was guaranteed to be the best chocolate you’ve ever tasted? Some people would. The first society ever known to use chocolate were the Aztecs somewhere around 1900 BC. It was originally served as a drink mixed with spices. But by the 16th century, it made its way over to Europe where it was mixed with sugar. Soon after, the very high class started enjoying something that resembles the chocolate we all know and love today. Despite the fact that most would consider it a necessity, chocolate is still a luxury item with global sales of over 100 billion dollars. So how much would you spend for this luxury item? Find out in today’s list. These are the 25 most expensive chocolates in the world.

Shugarman’s Little Chocolate Shop is the definition of “off the beaten path.” You won’t find a website for this 420-square-foot shop in Madrid, New Mexico, but if you visit, you’ll find an ever-rotating selection of uniquely flavored chocolates. Mixtures like dark chocolate with pink peppercorns, lavender, lemongrass and merlot salt sound crazy, but chocolatier Harvey Shugarman makes it work.
Enter the shop and you are instantly hit by the smell of the chocolate, as you look at a counter full of truffles, behind which there lies a kitchen. The truffles are large, and there are also other chocolate options (such as half orange slices, drops, etc) in boxes to the side. All that I have tasted warent the reviews people give for this temple to cocoa.
“Chocolate is my passion,” says Norman Love, who dreamed of making chocolate that was visually stunning as well as delicious. Love and a partner perfected a technique in which the colored designs for each candy are hand-painted or airbrushed into chocolate molds, which are then filled with the finest chocolate imported from Belgium, France, and Switzerland. The pumpkin white chocolate bonbon is almost too gorgeous to eat. Using only the freshest ingredients, his recipes call for pureed raspberries, bananas, ginger, caramel, passionfruit, and hazelnuts, to name a few.
This is a nice one! I'm not necessarily a super gourmand lover, but when I want to smell something just for myself and enjoy on a relaxed, rainy day at home I'm into the foodier smells. This is a great example of something foody but not sickly. There is a definite dryness to the chocolate. There also feels like a note of amber at the backend that keeps it from smelling JUST like an opened milk chocolate bar.
The praline/hazelnut mix starts to emerge in the background quickly after application. Hazelnut alone is more familiar, and I like to think I would've pointed it out without knowing about it ahead of time, but the addition of praline makes for a more nuanced and alien blend, albeit very desirable and certainly not taking much away from the cocoa-dominance of the fragrance.
The chocolate in these pieces was subdued. Mostly, I prefer a balance between chocolate and other flavors. In Richart’s pieces, chocolate does not contribute enough for me. Since it was weak, I tasted the chocolate by itself first before biting into a couple of pieces. The chocolate was slightly bitter without a lot of flavor. That is perhaps not unusual for French chocolate (and I prefer Belgian), but, at this price, I want chocolate to knock me over.
What kinds of chocolates can you get at Russell Stover? While you won't find anything overly exotic or gourmet, you'll find an appealing selection of just about everything else. Whether you want milk or dark chocolate, sampler or single-flavor boxes, or you'd like to build your own gift box, the website makes it easy for you to find it. Use the search box, or simply click on the brand you prefer (Russell Stover or Whitman's) at the top of the page, where you'll get a dropdown menu of the available product categories. In addition to chocolates, you'll also find gift baskets (with or without plush animals), hard candies and jelly beans, brittle and chocolate bars, and an outlet for clearance items at a discount.
This one absolutely lives up to its name- it’s not sweet but you get the sense of sweet things being concocted in a kitchen- I feel like I’m sitting in a cafe having a dark chocolate scented cigarette. It stays close to the skin and lasts a long time- the tobacco keeps this unisex and I adore it- the drydown on my skin ignores the chocolate and favors the hint of cigar from nearby that was smoked a couple of days ago. Warm, cozy, soft. Great for cold rainy weather and people watching via a cafe window.
We have a constantly changing curated selection of bars and confections from our favorite makers and chocolatiers often including Alma, Akesson, Amano, Amedei, Arete, Askinosie, Batch PDX, Bonnat, Byrne & Carlson, Castronovo, Chocolate Maker’s Studio, Cluizel, Cocanu, Dandelion, Dick Taylor, Domori, Fran’s, Fruition, Grenada Chocolate, Lillie Belle, Marou, Maverick, Only Child, Palette de Bine, Patric, Pump Street, Pralus, Smooth Chocolator, Soma, Ranger, Recchiuti, Ritual, Valrhona, Woodblock, Xocolatl De David.
There may be bars with frillier packaging and more envelope-pushing additions, but when it comes to pure, classic chocolate, Bonnat can lay claim to the crown. This family company began in 1884 and was beloved by Jackie Kennedy Onassis who gave bars to White House guests during the holidays. The Juliana bars are made from specially-grown Brazilian cacao beans, fermented, then dried in the sun slowly, over seven days. Back in France, the beans are painstakingly refined and tempered over five days. It’s an intricate process but, as Stephane Bonnat says, “In the Alps, we have time.”
Founder Colin Gasko is running a small but ambitious operation. Each single-origin chocolate bar at Rogue is sourced from independent farms in Peru, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, and Honduras. Unlike other fair-trade chocolate purveyors, Rogue pays more than twice the minimum for some of its cacao order to ensure the lasting success of those farms. Thanks to its small production, Rogue doesn’t always have a wide array available to purchase online, but each bar tastes like something special. Three Rivers, MA
Hédiard was my favorite of the fine chocolate stores I visited in my first trip to Paris. (It was later bested by Côte de France and Chocolat Michel Cluizel.) The tea (Thé) piece is good and brings out the chocolate flavor well. A hazelnut piece has good texture and a nice taste that develops after a moment. The flavors are strong but not overpowering, and the flavors in the assortment I bought were distinct from each other.
If you get a huge box of chocolates and can’t finish them in two weeks, you can store them in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. After that, the flavors of the creams and ganaches can turn stale. When storing chocolates in the refrigerator, take the same steps you would when refrigerating chocolate bars. Be sure to wrap the box very well in plastic wrap, and seal in a zip-top plastic bag. Prior to eating, let the chocolates come to room temperature before unwrapping to avoid any condensation.
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